A guided tour through the sounds of Latin American traditional music, its instruments and performers. By Edgardo Civallero

June 22, 2017

Turtle shells in traditional Latin American music

Turtle shells in traditional Latin American music

Part 05. Central America


 

In Panama, the Emberá or Ëpërá people (Comarca Emberá-Wounaan and Darien province) build and play the chimiguí, a turtle shell beaten with a wooden stick, while the Ngäbe or Guaymí people (Comarca Ngäbe-Bugle, and Bocas del Toro, Veraguas and Chiriquí provinces) use the ñelé, which has an edge smeared with wax and is played by rubbing it with the edge of the hand ― from the wrist to the fingertips. Also called guelekuada or seracuata, the ñelé is associated with a myth concerning the first time the balsería or krun took place (Brenes Candanedo, 1999), a traditional celebration that brings together different communities and where the instrument plays a leading role.

The same author notes that the Kuna or Guna people (Comarcas Guna Yala, Madugandí and Wargandí) use a turtle shell they call morrogala during a ceremonial dance after pubescent girls "first haircut", which is treated as a female rite passage.

Further north, the Garífuna people of the Caribbean coast (Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Honduras) play the taguel bugudura, and the neighboring Miskito people, living in the Honduran Caribbean coast, do so with their kuswataya ― literally, "the terrapin's skin" (CEDTURH, n.d.). Both idiophones are sounded by being struck with a wooden stick, a long nail, or even a deer's horn. Also in the Honduran Mosquitia, the Tawahka people play the cuah untak (SETUR-IHT, n.d.).

Finally, the tucutítutu or tucutícutu can be heard throughout Guatemala: a percussive turtle shell with an onomatopoeic name, which is played to accompany carols during "Las Posadas", popular festivals that take place nine days before Christmas.

 

Bibliography

Beaudet, Jean-Michel (1998). Wayãpi of Guyane: An Amazon soundscape. [CD]. Paris: Le Chant du Monde; Collection du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique / Musée de l'Homme.

Bentzon, Fridolin Weis (1963). Music of the Waiwai Indians. In Fock, Niels. Waiwai: Religion and society of an Amazonian tribe. [Thesis]. Copenhague: Nationalmuseet.

Bermúdez, Egberto (1985). Los instrumentos musicales en Colombia. Bogotá: Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Bermúdez, Egberto (2006). Shivaldamán: Música de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. [CD]. Bogotá: Fundación de Música.

Bórmida, Marcelo (2005). Ergon y mito: Una hermenéutica de la cultura material de los Ayoreo del Chaco Boreal. Archivos, 3 (2). [Online].

Bourg, Cameron (2005). Ancient Maya music now with sound. [Thesis]. Louisiana: State University. [Online].

Brenes Candanedo, Gonzalo (1999). Los instrumentos de la etnomúsica de Panamá. Panama: Autoridad del Canal de Panama.

Castellanos, Pablo (1970). Horizontes de la música precortesiana. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Cavour, Ernesto (1994). Instrumentos musicales de Bolivia. La Paz: E. Cavour.

CDI [Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas] (n.d.). 50 encuentros de música y danza indígena. [Patrimonio Documental de los Pueblos Indígenas de México]. [Online].

CEDTURH [Centro de Documentación Turística de Honduras] (n.d.). Instrumentos musicales autóctonos de Honduras. [Online].

Coppens, Walter et al. (1975). Music of the Venezuelan Yekuana Indians. [LP]. Washington: Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

Cruz, Natalia (2012). Guze Gola, en la interpretación del Grupo Gugu Huiini’. Comité Melendre. [Online].

Chávez, Margarethe et al. (2008). Instrumentos musicales tradicionales de varios grupos de la selva peruana. Datos Etnolingüísticos (Instituto Lingüístico de Verano), 36.

García Garagarza, León (2014). La tortuga, o el trueno y la lira. La Jornada de Morelos, July, 12. [Online].

García Gómez, Arturo (2013). Histoyre du Mechique de André Thévet. Patrimonio musical de la conquista. Neuma, 6 (2), pp. 28-45. [Online].

Gómez Gómez, Luis Antonio (2006). La documentación de la iconografía musical prehispánica. Revista Digital Universitaria, 7 (2). [Online].

Guzmán, José Antonio et al. (1984). Glosario de instrumentos prehispánicos. La música de México. Mexico: UNAM.

Hurtado Duéñez, Nina (2007). Instrumentos musicales indígenas del Amazonas venezolano. [Thesis]. Caracas: [n.i.]. [Online].

ICANH [Instituto Colombiano de Antropología e Historia] (2012). Caparazón de tortuga tukano. Colección Etnográfica ICANH. [Online].

Igualada, Francisco de; Castelví, Marcelino de (1938). Musicología indígena de la Amazonia colombiana. Boletín Latinoamericano de Música, 4, pp. 675-708.

ILV (1973). Aspectos de la cultura material de grupos étnicos de Colombia, I and II. Bogota: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, Ed. Townsend. [Online].

Jurado Barranco, María Eugenia (2013). Ayot Icacahuayo. La Jornada del Campo, 70, July, 20. [Online].

Mendoza Duque, Diana Alexandra (1992). Música de ritual: Umbral del tiempo. [Thesis]. Bogota: Universidad Nacional.

Miñana Blasco, Carlos (2009). Investigación sobre músicas indígenas en Colombia. Primera parte: un panorama regional. A Contratiempo: Música en la cultura, 13. [Online].

Musique du Monde (n.d.). Musique instrumentale des Wayana du Litani. [CD]. Paris: Buda Musique.

Národní Muzeum (2009). In the Shadow of the Jaguar. Exhibitions. [Online].

Novati, Jorge; Ruiz, Irma (1984). Mekamunaa. Estudio etnomusicológico sobre los Bora de la Amazonia peruana. [LP]. Buenos Aires: Instituto Nacional de Musicología "Carlos Vega".

Olsen, Dale A.; Sheehy, Daniel E. (eds.) (1998). The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. Vol. 2: South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. London: Routledge.

Pitarch Ramón, Pedro (1996). Animismo, colonialismo y la memoria histórica tzeltal. Revista Española de Antropología Americana, 26, pp. 183-203. [Online].

Sequera, Guillermo (2002). A la búsqueda de una cultura desconocida: los Tomárâho del Alto Paraguay. [Online].

SETUR-IHT [Secretaría de Turismo, Instituto Hondureño de Turismo] (n.d.). Compendio cultural. [Online].

SIL [Summer Institute of Lingüistics] (1999). Ididenicca ima / Relatos de nuestros antepasados. Culina (Madija), vol. 2. Lima: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano (SIL).

Stevenson, Robert (1976). Music in Aztec and Inca Territory. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stöckli, Matthias (2004). Iconografía musical. In LaPorte, Juan P. et al. (eds.) Actas del XVIII Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en Guatemala. [Online].

Szarán, Luis (1997). Diccionario de la música en el Paraguay. [Online].

Zender, Marc (2005). Para sacar a la tortuga de su caparazón: Ahk y Mahk en la escritura maya. PARI Journal, 6 (3), pp. 1-14. [Online].

 

About this article

Text: Edgardo Civallero.

Image: Turtle shell and deer horns from Central America [Unknown source].

This is the fifth part of the digital book Turtle shells in traditional Latin American music, by Edgardo Civallero, which may be read online on Issuu and freely downloaded here.

 


June 8, 2017

Turtle shells in traditional Latin American music

Turtle shells in traditional Latin American music

Part 04. Venezuela, the Guayanas and Brazil


 

In Venezuela, according to Hurtado Dueñez (2007), the Piaroa or Wötihä people (Amazonas state) use the rere, and the Ye'kuana or Maquiritare people (Bolivar and Amazonas states and neighboring regions of Brazil), the wayaamö ji'jo or kodedo. The rere is a shell of turtle chipiro or terecay (Podocnemis unifilis) with an end covered with wax or resin against which the thumb or index finger is rubbed. It is used only by men in secular contexts, such as the re-re dance, before and after the wärime, an elaborate harvest ritual celebrated annually. The wayaamö ji'jo is a shell of morrocoy (Chelonoidis carbonaria) played in the same fashion (wax rubbed with the edge of the hand) and also by men to accompany the sound of the panpipe suduchu (Coppens et al., 1975), which, in this particular case, is usually blown by a different musician (Olsen and Sheehy, 1998).

This combination of panpipes and rubbed turtle shells also appears among the Wayana people of the Litani and Maroni rivers, on the border between Suriname and French Guiana. The flute is called luweimë and has 5 pipes; the idiophone is named after the turtle species whose shell is used (kuliputpë, Chelonoidis denticulata, and pupu or terecay, Podocnemis unifilis). The musician holds the luweimë with the left hand and the shell under the left armpit, and rubs the plate with a stick, using his right hand. Unfortunately, this distinctive way of playing is becoming increasingly rare (Musique du Monde, n.d.).

Nearby, the Wayampi (Wayãpi) people of the Camopi and Oyapock rivers (French Guiana) possess a similar luweimë panpipe, which is played together with a pupu turtle shell (Beaudet, 1980, 1998). The Waiwai people (southern Guyana and bordering areas of the Brazilian states of Roraima and Pará) make the oratín from a shell of swamp turtle kwochí (Bentzon, 1963); its sound blends with that of a cane whistle to accompany a dance.

In Brazil, besides the shells used by the indigenous societies described above, Bentzon (1963) documented an instrument similar to the one used by the Waiwai among the Hixkariyana, the Mawayana, the Kaxuyana, and the Shereó peoples (northern areas of the state of Pará). Some museum collections (e.g. Národní Muzeum, 2009) include turtle shell idiophones made by the Karajá people (states of Goias and Tocantins).

 

Bibliography

Beaudet, Jean-Michel (1998). Wayãpi of Guyane: An Amazon soundscape. [CD]. Paris: Le Chant du Monde; Collection du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique / Musée de l'Homme.

Bentzon, Fridolin Weis (1963). Music of the Waiwai Indians. In Fock, Niels. Waiwai: Religion and society of an Amazonian tribe. [Thesis]. Copenhague: Nationalmuseet.

Bermúdez, Egberto (1985). Los instrumentos musicales en Colombia. Bogotá: Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Bermúdez, Egberto (2006). Shivaldamán: Música de la Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. [CD]. Bogotá: Fundación de Música.

Bórmida, Marcelo (2005). Ergon y mito: Una hermenéutica de la cultura material de los Ayoreo del Chaco Boreal. Archivos, 3 (2). [Online].

Bourg, Cameron (2005). Ancient Maya music now with sound. [Thesis]. Louisiana: State University. [Online].

Brenes Candanedo, Gonzalo (1999). Los instrumentos de la etnomúsica de Panamá. Panama: Autoridad del Canal de Panama.

Castellanos, Pablo (1970). Horizontes de la música precortesiana. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Cavour, Ernesto (1994). Instrumentos musicales de Bolivia. La Paz: E. Cavour.

CDI [Comisión Nacional para el Desarrollo de los Pueblos Indígenas] (n.d.). 50 encuentros de música y danza indígena. [Patrimonio Documental de los Pueblos Indígenas de México]. [Online].

CEDTURH [Centro de Documentación Turística de Honduras] (n.d.). Instrumentos musicales autóctonos de Honduras. [Online].

Coppens, Walter et al. (1975). Music of the Venezuelan Yekuana Indians. [LP]. Washington: Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

Cruz, Natalia (2012). Guze Gola, en la interpretación del Grupo Gugu Huiini’. Comité Melendre. [Online].

Chávez, Margarethe et al. (2008). Instrumentos musicales tradicionales de varios grupos de la selva peruana. Datos Etnolingüísticos (Instituto Lingüístico de Verano), 36.

García Garagarza, León (2014). La tortuga, o el trueno y la lira. La Jornada de Morelos, July, 12. [Online].

García Gómez, Arturo (2013). Histoyre du Mechique de André Thévet. Patrimonio musical de la conquista. Neuma, 6 (2), pp. 28-45. [Online].

Gómez Gómez, Luis Antonio (2006). La documentación de la iconografía musical prehispánica. Revista Digital Universitaria, 7 (2). [Online].

Guzmán, José Antonio et al. (1984). Glosario de instrumentos prehispánicos. La música de México. Mexico: UNAM.

Hurtado Duéñez, Nina (2007). Instrumentos musicales indígenas del Amazonas venezolano. [Thesis]. Caracas: [n.i.]. [Online].

ICANH [Instituto Colombiano de Antropología e Historia] (2012). Caparazón de tortuga tukano. Colección Etnográfica ICANH. [Online].

Igualada, Francisco de; Castelví, Marcelino de (1938). Musicología indígena de la Amazonia colombiana. Boletín Latinoamericano de Música, 4, pp. 675-708.

ILV (1973). Aspectos de la cultura material de grupos étnicos de Colombia, I and II. Bogota: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, Ed. Townsend. [Online].

Jurado Barranco, María Eugenia (2013). Ayot Icacahuayo. La Jornada del Campo, 70, July, 20. [Online].

Mendoza Duque, Diana Alexandra (1992). Música de ritual: Umbral del tiempo. [Thesis]. Bogota: Universidad Nacional.

Miñana Blasco, Carlos (2009). Investigación sobre músicas indígenas en Colombia. Primera parte: un panorama regional. A Contratiempo: Música en la cultura, 13. [Online].

Musique du Monde (n.d.). Musique instrumentale des Wayana du Litani. [CD]. Paris: Buda Musique.

Národní Muzeum (2009). In the Shadow of the Jaguar. Exhibitions. [Online].

Novati, Jorge; Ruiz, Irma (1984). Mekamunaa. Estudio etnomusicológico sobre los Bora de la Amazonia peruana. [LP]. Buenos Aires: Instituto Nacional de Musicología "Carlos Vega".

Olsen, Dale A.; Sheehy, Daniel E. (eds.) (1998). The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. Vol. 2: South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. London: Routledge.

Pitarch Ramón, Pedro (1996). Animismo, colonialismo y la memoria histórica tzeltal. Revista Española de Antropología Americana, 26, pp. 183-203. [Online].

Sequera, Guillermo (2002). A la búsqueda de una cultura desconocida: los Tomárâho del Alto Paraguay. [Online].

SETUR-IHT [Secretaría de Turismo, Instituto Hondureño de Turismo] (n.d.). Compendio cultural. [Online].

SIL [Summer Institute of Lingüistics] (1999). Ididenicca ima / Relatos de nuestros antepasados. Culina (Madija), vol. 2. Lima: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano (SIL).

Stevenson, Robert (1976). Music in Aztec and Inca Territory. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stöckli, Matthias (2004). Iconografía musical. In LaPorte, Juan P. et al. (eds.) Actas del XVIII Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en Guatemala. [Online].

Szarán, Luis (1997). Diccionario de la música en el Paraguay. [Online].

Zender, Marc (2005). Para sacar a la tortuga de su caparazón: Ahk y Mahk en la escritura maya. PARI Journal, 6 (3), pp. 1-14. [Online].

 

About this article

Text: Edgardo Civallero.

Image: Turtle shells of the Patamona people (Guayana) [www.kringla.nu].

This is the fourth part of the digital book Turtle shells in traditional Latin American music, by Edgardo Civallero, which may be read online on Issuu and freely downloaded here.